Gov. Kim Reynolds and Lt. Gov. Adam Gregg, along with state education leaders, announced that School Administrators of Iowa (SAI) has launched a statewide initiative to coach more principals on how to make the most of the Teacher Leadership and Compensation (TLC) system.

“This is a remarkable tribute to focusing on long term sustainability,” Gov. Reynolds said. “It speaks to the value educators place on Iowa’s TLC system and provides a systematic approach to continually improving instruction to raise student achievement. We know when principals understand how to support teacher leaders, it leads to success.”

The principal support program will build on the Iowa Department of Education’s previous work with the New York City Leadership Academy. Together, in collaboration with the Area Education Agencies (AEA) and SAI, the education department and leadership academy built a comprehensive curriculum with the goal of training school administrators in how to facilitate TLC to maximize support for teachers.

“Iowa’s TLC system has empowered teachers to take on important leadership roles in their schools, setting the stage for all teachers to learn from each other instead of operating in isolation within their classrooms,” Iowa Department of Education Director Ryan Wise said. “The principal support program helps principals develop the skills they need to maximize the impact of their teacher leaders.”

This school year, SAI stepped in to help train 27 principals. Next school year, SAI has committed to expand training with workshops and one-on-one coaching for 100 principals.

“SAI looks forward to extending this program to more principals and adding a second-year option for prior participants,” SAI Executive Director Roark Horn said. “Coaching principals to master emerging school improvement strategies, particularly in the area of encouraging teacher leadership, illustrates how committed we all are to working together to provide the best education for Iowa students.”

Iowa currently has the most extensive TLC system in the nation. More than 25 percent of teachers in all of the state’s 333 school districts are in leadership roles, such as instructional coaches and mentors.